Boniface River Station

The Boniface River Station is owned and run by CEN whose secretariat is based at Université Laval, Québec, Canada. This station is part of the CEN Network. This station is located within the forest-tundra less than 10 km from treeline and some 30 km from Hudson Bay. It is comprised of three individual buildings (one with a shower) that serve primarily as laboratories and a kitchen building. These are powered by solar energy and heated with an oil furnace. Onsite there are two zodiac-style boats. Access to the different research sites is primarily by helicopter or by the Boniface River, which is navigable for some 20 km.

BRS 1

Field work

Name Email Phone Number
Primary Contact Christine Barnard christine.barnard@cen.ulaval.ca or cen@cen.ulaval.ca (418) 656-2131, ext. 2503 or (418) 656-3340
Secondary Contact Claude Tremblay claude.tremblay@cen.ulaval.ca (418) 929-3319

Download Boniface River Station profile as a PDF document

Owner
Centre d’études nordiques (CEN)/Centre for Northern Studies

Membership
Regular Member

Website
www.cen.ulaval.ca/en/page.aspx?lien=stationboniface

Latitude
57.75

Longitude
-76

Location
This research station is located far from any human settlement. The Boniface River Research Station was constructed in 1985 by Professor Serge Payette to conduct research on past treeline and tree growth dynamics in the context of climate change. It was upgraded in 2010.

Nearest Community
Inukjuak (140 km) by air

Territory/ Province
Quebec

Aboriginal Government/ Homeland
www.krg.ca/en
Makivik Corporation is currently working on a research licensing system.
www.makivik.org/

Facility Type
Year-Round Research Station (no manager present)

Research Hinterland
Discontinuous Permafrost, Lake, Treeline, Wetland, Woodland Tundra

Main Research Disciplines
Biochemistry, Environmental Sciences, Geomorphology, Limnology, Mapping/GIS, Paleoecology, Paleolimnology, Terrestrial Biology/Ecology

Research History
Meteorological stations installed within the proximity of the research station have been recording the prevailing conditions at the tree limit, including the thermal contrast (air and soil) between tundra and forest environments, since 1988. In addition, tree growth has been measured with the aid of a dozen electronic dendrometers since the summer of 2005. Data is available via the Nordicana D data repository (www.cen.ulaval.ca/nordicanad/) and upon request (cen@cen.ulaval.ca).

Current Projects
Include: vegetation dynamics of subarctic toposequence and interaction between climate and forest fires; genetic homogeneity in ecological heterogeneity of Quebec subarctic forests in relation to climatic change; black spruce growth as indicator of climate change in northern Quebec; etc.

Power
Generator, Solar

Communications
Satellite phone required

Local Transportation
Boat, zodiac available on site

Equipment Storage
N/A

Dormitory/Sleeping Facilities
Dormitory tents and sleeping bags for researchers and students can be provided by the CEN. Typically, between five and 20 people can be found at the research station during the summer season.

Dining/Kitchen Facilities
Presently, the station is comprised of three individual buildings (one with a shower) that serve primarily as laboratories and a kitchen building.

Laboratory Facilities
Dry lab

Fuel Availability
Must make arrangements to have fuel flown in prior to arrival

Research Requirements
No licensing or permitting required. Local authorities should be informed of your intended work (www.krg.ca/en; www.makivik.org/). Makivik Corporation is currently working on a research licensing system.

Special Rules and Regulations
A high degree of self-sufficiency is required.

Local External Resources
N/A

Nearest Medical Service
Health Centre in Inukjuak (140 km) and Hospital in Puvirnituq

Safety Considerations
First aid kit; satellite phone; weapon; pepper spray; presence of black bears and polar bears sighted as well.

Cost
www.cen.ulaval.ca/en/page.aspx?lien=stationboniface#reservation

Other Information
The Boniface River Research Station was constructed in 1985 by Professor Serge Payette to conduct research on past treeline and tree growth dynamics in the context of climate change. The facilities were upgraded in 2010. Presently, the station is comprised of three buildings that serve primarily as laboratories and a kitchen building. Access to the different research sites is primarily by helicopter or by the Boniface River, which is navigable for some 20 km. No communities live at or near Boniface River Station. The nearest community is Inukjuak over 120 km away and on the shores of eastern Hudson Bay. Accessible summer only. By air charter (300 m long airstrip situated on the opposite shore from camp). Beginning in the summer of 2001, supplies for the research station have been delivered primarily by ñtwin otterî airplane thanks to the airstrip situated on the opposite shore of the research station. Access to the station is by chartered helicopter or twin otter, departing from Whapmagoostui-Kuujjuarapik.

Last Updated
15-05-30